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to speak here today. everyone knows about how tough warren was. as john mccain said, he was sort of new hampshire. he was fair. it is how i have always looked at warren rudman. one thing that has not been mentioned is what i admired most about warren is the value that my parents value the most. there was never a man or woman that he never looked that without dignity. some think they know so much better than ordinary people. i think maybe the reason why warren had such a basic belief in the inherent good and capacity of ordinary people -- it was never about ted agree -- pedigree. he didn't yield to that person in the room who have the most advanced degree. he was as bright as anyone in the room. thing i admired most about him was that i believed that he believed, given half the chance, ordinary plain americans, did not need someone with a higher iq. they didn't need someone with an advanced degree. they didn't need someone to tell them what was in their own interest. people somehow think that they are better. they somehow think that they are not a capable of m
of the appropriations and budget committee. also joined by georgetown university tax law professor john buckley on how the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do n
is on the floor. i may have to excuse myself and go back and leave and try to work that out. we have given john mccain a little bit of time off from the floor tonight. i will go back to see if we can speed things up a little. warren rudman was born with a fighting spirit. he learned that because of his being jewish. he fought anti-semitism. he fought it physically. that is how he learned how to be tough early on. he wrote that in his memoir. he was a boxer at syracuse university -- joe's school. he commanded an army infantry in the korean war, where he fought valiantly and was decorated for his heroism as a result of that. this shaped his views about the world. i learned in korea, he said, that war was a lousy idea. that is a direct quote from warren rudman. as a senator and later as a national security expert, he believed, that was a last resort. he was a critic of the iraq war. he spoke out against the iraq war. he worried that our troops were not being taken care enough. there were being asked too much with too little. he considered his critique of the iraq war his patron of duty. he said he
john mckinnon. but first of all, do you have any loopholes that you take advantage of? caller: i am a senior and i pay taxes on my social security and my pension. host: did you ever take a deduction for owning your own home or anything like that? caller: i don't own a home. host: ok, thanks. guest: he makes an interesting point. when obamacare is taking effect in the next few years, and there is a lot of uncertainty among businesses, small businesses in particular, that feel they are facing an expensive mandate to provide health care coverage to their workers. they feel there is a backup system is being put in place to provide coverage to those workers and other folks who are not able to get coverage in the workplace. there's a lot of uncertainty among businesses in particular about how it is going to affect them. that is part of the overall of the business community. if you are concerned about the burden that is going to create for individuals, i think that is really less of a concern, and particularly for those getting older. it is really not a concern at all. medicare is still go
and applause] >> and in keeping with tradition, the speaker of the house, the honorable john boehner, will extend his holiday greetings to you and officially light this remarkable tree in a few moments. but before we get to that big moment, i'd like to welcome members of congress and distinguished guests, our capitol hill neighbors and those of you who are visiting our nation's capital. thank you for joining us this evening. i would like to acknowledge members of the colorado delegation in attendance this evening including senator mark udall, senator michael bennet, congressman scott tipton as well as former senator ben knight horse campbell. [cheers and applause] >> and senator campbell, of course, drove that tree 5,500 miles to washington dis-- d.c. [cheers and applause] >> now this incredibly beautiful tree has been deck indicated with ornaments crafted by colorado residents which reflect the theme celebrating our great outdoors. and speaking of ownerments, the u.s. capitol historical society produces a beautiful one to place upon this tree. and at this time, i would like to welco
all very much. >> house speaker john bender and other members of the gop leadership spoke for 10 minutes. >> good morning everyone. you know, this week, we made a good faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis and that offer included significant spending cuts and reforms and included additional revenue. and frankly, it was the balanced approach that the president's been asking for. white house. with ourselves. our targets and framework are things that we can all agree on. and it's exactly how we approached our discussions in the biden group, my discussions at the white house a year and a half ago and for that matter, in the joint select committee. and if the president doesn't agree with our proposal and our outline, i think he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. and a plan that can pass both chambers of congress. if you look at the plans that the white house has talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president and to work with him to make sure that the american people aren't disadvantaged by what's h
. i often thought the reason why warren thought that is because in combat, like john and others and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with 8th grade and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of daniel inouye who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed that the coolest lives are often told in silence. he would come up to you and say, i was flat wrong. let me conclude by saying that one of the tests in all of my years is that for warren rudman, he
. first, president obama speaks in pennsylvania, followed by john boehner responded to the president from capitol hill. then eric cantor response of the lighthouse deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end of the bush tax cuts on those earning more than two and a $50,000. ed -- more than $250,000. ["hail to the chief" plays] please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joel glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you, guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and applause] now, i just finished getting a tour of the workshop. i have to say it makes me wish that joel invented this stuff sooner when i was a kid. back then, you couldn't build a roller coaster out of your erector set
: on the subject of the fiscal cliff, john boehner declares a stalemate. this is the headline in an article from politico. the major sticking points remain the same, congressional democrats want to raise taxes on the highest income earners while keeping the current lower tax rates in place for the middle class. republicans want to extend tax breaks at all levels. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." we are going to be talking about the fiscal cliff, the statements the house speaker made about being a stalemate and what the president said during his trip to a toy factory in pennsylvania. here are the numbers. you can also reach out to us by e-mail and twitter and facebook, all of the social media as. on twitter the addresses @cspanwj, facebook.com/cspan. more from the article by jake sherman with the headline " fiscal cliff." he writes -- let's go to the phones. the first call comes from debbie in flint, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not
for a government of the many and not government of the money. john larson is the perfect person in that regard. first, i want to talk about the subject at hand. the president has his pen in hand. he is ready to sign the middle class income tax. a similar bill was introduced into the house at that time. since then, we have been asking republican leadership to bring middle income tax cuts to the floor. the clock is ticking. it is important for the tax legislation to happen now. we are calling on the republican leadership in the house to bring this legislation to the floor next week. we believe that not doing that and holding the middle income tax cuts hostage for the tax cuts for the rich will heap mountains mountains of debt on future generations. to that end, if there is no announcement of scheduling of the middle income tax cuts -- which by the way, it has tremendous support in the republican caucus -- i think we will get 100% vote if they came to the floor. if it is not scheduled, on tuesday we will be introducing a discharge petition. if we can get a certain number of signatures, it will ri
majority. >> senator carl levin and senator john mccain are managing this bill. we understand they hope to finish it in three days. that will not happen. how much more work is there to do? >> is remains to be seen. a lot needs to be sorted out behind the scenes. i do believe they would like to be finished by monday. that is where we are now. >> the house approved its defense authorization bill earlier this year. how does the senate bill differ? >> i was just speaking to some people on the house side, and they do not see any major difficulties in getting this done. last year, they were able to get a conference done in roughly nine days. i was assured they believe they can do the same this time. it does not look like it is going to be terribly contentious. both committees were trying to keep this non-controversial. as you know, we are coming to the end of the session so they need it quickly. >> do you think they will be able to do it by the end of the year? >> absolutely. >> thank you for your time. >> my pleasure. >> the senate returns on monday at 2:00 p.m. to resume consideration on th
as the star john major. >> thank you. -- as the sergeant major. >> thank you. a 50-50 district went for president obama appeared a long history of being centrist on issues but very pragmatic. the farming district includes health care systems. spearhead and some of the reforms there. what came loud and clear through was, let's try to focus on the politics we agree on, move those things, and then come back later to the things we disagree on. the issue of a discharge petition to move forward, this is something we agree on. there is not a single republican who signs this who is violating any pledge they took on taxes. this will ensure we think the middle class tax. it provides a certainty you heard the talk about during a very important time to spend money for this. i think it spends -- sends a strong signal. maybe there is another component to this. there are other members who have to go back home and say, what did you do to make this different? all we are asking for is folks will vote for this. i think many in the house will eventually vote for this anyway. the president said he will
security will have its money. caller: they tell you all kinds of things. host: john in atlanta, democratic caller. caller: how are you? it seems like it is open phones. i think as far as the fiscal cliff is concerned, the democrats and republicans need to come together and they need to do that rather quickly, because that's the way i feel about it. host: do you think it decides it should just agree to pass the tax cuts -- extend the tax cuts for middle-class americans and then wait until later to resume the debate over spending and tax cuts for wealthy americans? caller: they should start with that. and if they agree on that, then they can go on to the next thing. but this lagging and dragging along on both sides makes no sense. host: here is the washington post this morning. [video clip] >> i don't think the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that is relevant is the acknowledgment that if we are going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with very tough cuts we have already made and further reforms and entitlements i'm prepared to make, that
and economic environment worldwide. we should not accept going through that. john engler, he and i don't philosophically agree -- i'm being honest about john, but he comes from the other party but he is exactly right when he said that the only thing that debt ceiling is good for as a weapon is to destroy your credit rating. so i want to send a very clear message to people here, we aren't going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggests that they are going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. because we have to break that habit before it starts. captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> you can see more of president obama's remarks tonight on c-span at 9:00 eastern. house speaker john boehner called on the white house to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal released earlier this week. at 8:00 eastern,
. from facebook, john says -- james says -- diana says -- here are some of the twitter comments we have received. bill says -- and biff -- and steve says -- and finally, jim says -- robert, north carolina, the republican line. caller: after this term of four years with the democrats, i don't think she has a chance. i am a business owner. four more years of this, i will be out of business. host: what kind of business do you have? caller: bulldozer's. host: how has business been over the last couple of years? caller: bad. i am barely staying in business. i do not know what to look forward to. i can hardly stay in business. the democrats in this country i think is wanting to kill us. business people, i cannot stand much more of it. host: robert on the republican line. linda is in texas. caller: i am just thrilled with the idea then. the only thing i would be more thrilled about is obama for a third term. host: but that is not constitutional. caller: a good president with a good philosophy for this country. what the role of government is, he is the right person at the right time to get this
. the president, john boehner, could be getting set to talk again later this week. what advice would you give them on taxes? >> these are very minor issues, in terms of total revenue derived. but they are very significant to members. if you were to tell the bulk of the democratic caucus in the house that we were going to do something draconian to the inheritance tax, that could cost you a lot of votes. this is a carefully crafted a balanced package the house to emerge. all these issues need to be tested. a little focus group on the conference side. these can be symbolically important. they can blow the opportunity to do something broadbased and fundamental. do we end up with something close to balsams and because of that point? >> we would be better off if speaker boehner and the president did not publicly change their offers. hopefully, they are going to have to compromise. the more times you commit yourself in public, the harder it is to make the compromise. >> we will go around the former members of congress. do they cut a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff before we actually get there? >> i believ
satellite corp. 2012] >> house speaker john boehner said today he disagrees with a proposal from congressman tom call who suggested he and his gop colleagues should renew middle-class tax cut and allowed the top tax rates to let -- rise. tonight, we speak from -- hear from speaker boehner, house democrats, and president obama on the so-called fiscal clef. later, alan simpson and erskine bowles talk about some of the fiscal choices facing congress. >> the program began under one of the advisers to president franklin roosevelt to document the conditions under which people were living. this was back when we did not have television. we had radio, but a lot of places did not have electricity, so they could not listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on in other parts of the country. he was an economist from columbia university. he was the head of this project. in 1939, when kodak introduced color film, they sent him to have his photographers try out, see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market and product, and they wanted people who would know how to use it
speaker john boehner, the headlines, some of the details of what the white house offered. a little rundown. host: again, that's just some of the highlight from the what the white house offered from tim geithner. we'll show you that during the course of our time together. but again, we want your reaction, not just to the proposal itself but what you think congress should do about it. so if you want to give us a call, (202)585-3880 for democrats. (202)585-3881 for republicans and (202) 628-0205 for independents. "the washington post" this morning also profiles the man who delivered the message. it was tim geithner. obama's unlikely negotiator, read the headlines. another wrote that mr. geithner plans to step down in january and the fact that he selected him shows how much the president has come to rely on him. >> the huffington post if you were to go to their website has this to add to their story about the proposal itself from tim geithner saying the proposal wasn't new. that have it was presented earlier this month by the president at the white house. host: so again, to reiterate what the
to our nation in beijing. i would like to say john thornton, cheng li and jerome cohen for this series. for bringing he weifang to the broader international audience, you are enriching the knowledge of china. thank you very much. it is fitting that he weifang should be the first person from the world of law in this series. he is somebody of incredible courage, which, incisiveness, and preach against -- prescience. i cherished member -- memories from harvard where we had a lot of discussions across the seminar cable and going to the boston symphony and, best of all, enjoying pigboat -- pick le tongue sandwiches. i want to frame my remarks today awhile -- around he weifang's writing. because of my respect for him, i want to convey the majesty of what he has done in a friendly, constructive way and push a little bit on a few points. specifically, i want to engage four respects in that will illuminate broader point about the challenges of law reform in china. he first concerns the chinese tradition. he takes great pride in his heritage, as he should, he does not see it as providing abundan
that there be a first-time home buyer market? this is 43% of it. there you go. >> i am tom stanton. i teach at johns hopkins university, and i would like to talk about administrative capacity, which is different from the discussion of authorities that congress might give fha to adjust premiums or what ever. i am curious, sarah, you and nick would see this and that made 1990's thought and the private mortgage industry killed that so fast all of our heads spun. i was told how much they disliked the idea. what are the politics this time around, because that strikes me as one of the few ways one could get to the improvements in people, processes, and assistance. >> well, my experience at that time is one that i think about a lot, what the opportunities are now. at the end of the day, there were two sets of ideas embodied in the proposal we had at the time. one was the ability to deal with the administrative flexibility and hiring a computer systems and the like. the other was programmatic, giving us the ability to essentially doubled the products that we serve a long performance measures. i think the re
harper to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. defazio, for five minutes. mr. defazio: well, yesterday the republicans released a vague press release saying it constituted a counteroffer to the president's road map to avoid driving over the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority numbe
with house speaker john boehner and minority leader nancy pelosi. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of six-three, i believe, and they will say that is precedent. indiana had a voter i.d. -- >> they decided on the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish id they did not say all of that was subsequently -- >> they talked about indiana. you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. we always have to make -- there has to be a special mass when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we really need to make concessions for them because they cannot follow the rules lik
in and try to work that out. we have given john a little bit of time off from the for tonight. i will go back to see if we can speed things up a little. warren rudman was born with a fighting spirit. he learned that because of him being jewish. he fought anti-semitism. he fought it physically. that is how he learned how to be tough. he wrote that in his memoir. he was a boxer at syracuse university. joe'he commanded an army industry during the korean war. he was decorated for his heroism. this shape his views about the world. i learned in korea, he said, that war was a lousy idea. that is a direct quote from warren rudman. as a senator and national security expert, he believed, that was a last resort. he was a critic of the iraq war. he worried that our troops were not being taken care enough. there were being asked to much with too little. he considered his critique of iraq for his patron of duty. he spoke out when he volunteered and spent 13 months on the front line in combat in korea. warren had a great respect for the bond shared by those who experienced combat, a medal of honor winner an
credited the leaders. we know who they were. you also have to give credit to those who follow. as john pointed out, there were those who did not follow. you need to appoint the people who do negotiating and let them be leaders and hope that others follow. as the minority house negotiator, i believe my single most important contribution to that agreement of 1990 was i did not get on the way of anybody doing important things. the final negotiations have to be done at the top. they have to have support. republican support fell apart in the house. as an interesting aside, i would mention there is a submission is suspicion that that maybe this year, that the house negotiators may not have all the support on the government side, as we did not have in 1990. i think john was right about the opposition bubbling up pretty much at the end of the process. i am not a perceptive fellow, because it did not occur to me until perhaps a week before the first vote came up that we were getting into trouble and we had a lot of falling off. the deadlines are crucial. without them, negotiations never end. i
to deductions and tax loopholes. some are potentially on the chopping block. joining us is john mckinnon from "the wall street journal." what are loopholes and deductions? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts. whether you like a loophole depends where you sit. deductions are the ones most people are most familiar with. the big itemized deductions are the home mortgage interest deduction. the deduction for charitable contributions is important. there are all kinds of other breaks. there are some that are big that people may not be aware of. the health care that we get a work represents a big source of income to a lot of people. it doesn't count as income on your taxes. that is a giant break in itself and known as an exemption. there are other breaks that exist. the earned income tax credit goes to the working poor. then folks with children get a child credit that is a lucrative credit, worth $1,000 per child right now. congress loves tax breaks. host: is there a difference between a deduction and tax credits? guest: a deduction is something you take off your income. a credit i
followed by house speaker john banner responding from capitol hill. then eric cantor response to the white house deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see
the honorable charles j. fleischmann to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has passed s. 1998, cited as the d.h.s. audit requirement target act of 2012, in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: the chair now recognizes the gentleman from north carolina, mr. jones, for five minutes. mr. jones: mr.
tax rate were the 90% marginal rates, the 70% marginal rates that they were when john f. kennedy was president and he cut taxes or whether they were 28 marginal rate during the reagan years. mr. speaker, it turns out -- and this is of no surprise to you -- turns out the american people are pretty smart. and if you raise taxes on this behavior, they switch to this behavior. and if you raise taxes on that behavior, they switch to this behavior. because at the end of the day we are more concerned about taking care of our parents, raising our kids, than we are about funding the federal government. so we make changes in our lives to respond to the tax code. so whether taxes are at a top marginal rate of 28% or 90% before the john f. kennedy presidency, america paid the same amount as a percentage of g.d.p. in taxes. this chart shows that. taxes relatively constant going out over that horizon. mr. speaker, spending, this red line here -- now you can see this red line is higher than the green line for the past 50 years. this business of running deficits is not new. we've been running de
speaker john boehner held his own meeting on the fiscal cliff negotiations. this is close do 10 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. the president traveled to pennsylvania to visit a small business today to talk about the fiscal cliff. unfortunately, it's the president and members of his own party who were proposing that we let many small businesses, as in hundreds of thousands of them, go over the fiscal cliff. simply put, that's why we don't have an agreement as yet. they said yesterday this is not a game. i used to be a small business owner. small business owners are regular men and women from all backgrounds who, in today's economy, are facing challenges on a daily basis. and the president's tax increase would be another crippling blow for them while doing little to nothing to solve the bigger problem here, which is our national deficit and our national debt. this debt doesn't exist because we don't tax small businesses enough. it exists because washington continues to spend too much. raising taxes on small businesses instead of taking a balanced approach that also cuts spending is
will be good. roughly $1 trillion, $600 billion from tax reform, and house speaker john boehner has millions from tax reform. a logical number would be something like $1.40 trillion, $70 billion from reform, senator dollars billion from tax rates. $700 billion from tax rates. we talked about some spending items in the day. you can come up with some numbers that will work, and here is the bottom line. i think our goal in terms of the market should be a deficit that is small enough at the end of the decade so that the debt to gdp ratio stabilizes. it would be great to get it down, but if we could get it stable by the end of the decade, we will not solve our problems forever, but we will solve the problems now, markets will be ok, businesses will be ok, and the fundamentals will improve, and we will be in much better shape. >> does anyone want to weigh in on the plan? $7 billion in reform. >> if you take their rates to 39.5% and then you cap deductions, what is your top effective rate? -- what is your effective rate on the top income people? another $700 billion on top. what is your actual effe
. chairman, whether it is our current chairman, john larson, or our future chairman -- whoever gets to lead this caucus knows we have got an enthusiastic group of committed representatives of this country ready to get the job done. >> questions? >> congressman, if republicans are willing to step up and raise revenue, will house democrats provide votes to cut benefits to programs like medicare and medicaid? >> let me say that clearly, as gene sperling was sent today, the president is willing to look at what they're going to put forward in terms of revenues, but that has not been forthcoming, shall we say. with the president has been very clear is in terms of the impact on beneficiaries and beneficiaries are the people who are the recipients of medicaid, medicare, and social security -- we believe at most would agree that social security is not responsible for the deficit and should not be on at the table for discussion. with regard to the so-called entitlements -- i come from hartford, connecticut. this is a matter of insurance and it is a matter of actuarial assumptions. and i think when yo
hear from house speaker john boehner after meeting with treasury secretary tim geithner. that is followed by house democratic leaders after their meeting. then, senate democrats explain what they're looking for in negotiations with republicans. friday on "washington journal," a congressional this story and gives a history of the filibuster rule in the senate and explains the changes senate leader harry reid is pursuing. then austin tell us less starting at 7:00 eastern on c-span. -- washington journal is live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> we had 2000 flag officers and generals. today we had one dozen flak officers and generals. the ratio is out of whack. it is not a captain, and a battle of. we look at where we can not only save the money, but we can transfer responsibilities at of the pentagon and consolidate programs and serious significant amount of money. >> this weekend you can talk about tom coburn above the fiscal cliff and the republican party in "in the." on c-span 2. >> his comments, the same day timothy geithner made the rounds on capitol hill, visiting with h
with and established icon of judiciary prominence in john conyers, the two matched well in their excellence. and i thank the ranking member and the former chairperson for his work and service. there's great work being done by the judiciary committee, and i think it is enormously important that we are the holders and protectors of the constitution on behalf of not only our members but on behalf of the united states of america. it is not at this time, but i do want to acknowledge and hope this house will consent at the appropriate time to acknowledge one of our fallen of great prominence of this committee, someone who i sat in his office as a baby member of congress, the honorable jack brooks, who has passed. and i hope there will be an appropriate moment for us to honor him before we leave today. . i rise to be able to thank the sponsor of this legislation, attract my interest in it to correct something that probably was thought to be a good direction but was not and the limitation of coverage of the president and the president's children, the first family's children. as a member of the homeland se
they are looking for in negotiations with republicans. house speaker john boehner told reporters there has been no progress in two weeks of discussions on the fiscal cliff. his comments came on the same day guide ner made rounds on capitol hill. this is ten minutes. >> good morning, everyone. the president has warned us about the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff. but his actions have not matched his public statements. members of his own party seem quite comfortable with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. on tuesday, we had productive conversation at the white house. despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style rallies are not the way to get things done in washington. a discussion with the treasury secretary was frank and direct. we hope to see
john mccain. who will hold a briefing on another topic, he'll be talking about syria. but there is a vote going on on the senate floor a vote on the russia trade bill, that's under way. it may postpone senator mccain's comments just a bit. you heard senator reid, leader reid, asked about the resignation of jim demint who announced he's resigning to take over the conservative think tank the heritage foundation. he'll resign effective january 1. he was first elected to the senate in 2004. the senate is in today. they're voting on the russia trade bill. they have a couple of judicial nominations as well, after that, the -- legislatively that ought to do it for the senate. we're staying live here in the senate radio and tv gallery, expecting senator john mccain to come out shortly for a briefing. later at about 1:30, we'll take you live to a conference looking a at the arab spring and nuclear proliferation and later at 4:30 here in washington, the lighting of the national christmas tree, that's coming up for you this afternoon on c-span. the senate is in, votes under way
.1. from political co, john boehner to g.o.p., stick together. next call, terry in north carolina. caller: good morning. host: please go ahead with your comment about spending in the fiscal cliff. kip well ok, i'm going to tell you as a native american what the government's done for our people pretty much for 150 years. we've been given a check, barely enough to survive. on the reservation, high poverty, drug, alcohol, suicide rates. i look at the last 50 years and what the government's done for the black man, i've never seen not one public housing complex. you can go down to hud and look at all the little by they girls sitting in their with a baby in one arm and a cell phone and a cigarette in the other -- host: so terry, what's your point? caller: what my point is is that democrats are putting this country into poverty. plain and simple. host: all right, we got your point, thank you for calling in this morning. from politico this morning -- that's from politico this morning, and this is from the hill newspaper -- hagel, a centrist on foreign policy has expressed support for some of the
that round of applause. let me thank both john and javier for including me in this press conference and for welcoming me to the leadership of the house of the democratic caucus. i'm very pleased to be here at this very important moment in time in our nation's history as well. i agree with both john, javier, and i should say as well with tim walz and i won't steal your thunder, tim, what you do today is important not only i think for we as a caucus in terms of setting where we are at but i think also a strong message that the american people sent almost a month ago had a they want to see this congress working to get things done. they re-elected the president. the president ran on an agenda of giving a tax break to 98% of the american people, and that opportunity is before us. the senate has worked their will. it's now our opportunity to do that before the holiday season is over. the expression time is fleeting has never been more apropos than it is today. we have very few working days left in this 112th congress to actually act upon what the american people want us to do, and we have
and house speaker john boehner. the president said in remarks to the business round table today that he was aware of reports that republicans may be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy as a way to avert the looming fiscal cliff and then come back next year with more leverage to extract spending cuts from the white house in exchange for raising the government's borrowing limit. we'll also have house speaker john boehner's news conference today where he said it's time for the white house to respond to monday's republican proposal for avoiding the fiscal cliff. see the president and speaker boehner tonight at 9:00 eastern. elsewhere on the hill today the senate appropriations committee on homeland security held a hearing on fema's response to hurricane sandy. senators from new york, rhode island, connecticut and delaware testified before the committee on the challenges their constituents face in the aftermath of the storm and what's needed to move forward. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for joining us for this very important hearing on the response and recovery and th
. >> thanks, john. we have reached a grave moment in the war that's raging in syria now for 20 months. and it's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with n
, that is the same of what speaker john vader, offered the president in their negotiations -- speaker john boehner offered the president in their negotiations in 2011. the white house has consistently signaled a loss of of weeks that they will not accept any deal that keeps tax rates for the wealthy. >> russell burma is a staff writer for the hill. thank you. >> thank you. >> and you can go to our website c-span.org to read the letter that the president wrote to house rubble can survey. journal" iston goura live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependent on foreign oil according to a new survey. -- report. >> this weekend on c-span 3, the city prepares to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead and listen to to to accommodate what i can to say this as the happen again. >> we will be joined in washington to discuss meetings. >> the members of congress were told -- the committee also hea
of capital gains. the capital gains tax will go up 10%. host: john from new mexico. caller: thank you for taking my call. you read my tweet just a little while ago. i want to continue on this theme of the lower capital gains rate. this low capital gains rate is a way the uber rich use to control to give themselves their own tax rate and their own general tax category to there everything in. they can lessen their participation in our democracy. i have investments, too. to only have to pay a 15% rate on that income seems silly to me. i pay normal taxes and normal social security. there is no need to incentivize capital formation these days. host: are you retired? caller: i am still working. host: this is a story from "the wall street journal." host: "families with adult children." how can you take advantage if you're a couple and one spouse earns more than the other? guest: i would not want to delve into that. host: we will move on to jim in north carolina. go ahead, jim. caller: thank you for taking myy call. the lowering to the $1 million cap. my wife and i have never made more than $
, and both sides of congress today. we expect to hear comments from leader pelosi. we also heard from john boehner during his briefing. he said there has been no progress between the white house in reaching a deal. he spoke to reporters for just under 10 minutes. >> >> good morning, everyone. the president has warned us about the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff. but his actions have not matched his public statements. members of his own party seemed quite comfortable with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. we have a dairy production cuts tuesday we had productive conversation at the white house. despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style or allies is not aid -- campaign-style rally is not the way to get things done in washington. a disc
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